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In a photo from Feb. 12, 2014, the Detroit skyline is seen from the city's midtown. Detroit’s creditors and residents are expected to get their first official glimpse this week of the road out of bankruptcy, even as fights and tinkering continue. A proposal to restructure the city’s debt could be filed by state-appointed emergency manager Kevyn Orr to the bankruptcy court as early as Wednesday, Feb. 19. It’s considered a blueprint for Detroit, undergoing the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)
Detroit files plan to fix debt, leave bankruptcy
First Published Feb 21 2014 03:03 pm • Last Updated Feb 21 2014 03:02 pm

DETROIT • Detroit’s emergency financial manager filed a plan Friday that would bring the city out of bankruptcy, providing for the first time a detailed look at what the Motor City would look like when it finally sheds its financial burdens.

The goal: A leaner, cleaner and safer Detroit.

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The plan, which still needs approval from a bankruptcy judge and will likely be subject to numerous appeals and challenges in the months to come, aims to pour money into the city’s aging infrastructure and clean up the city’s blighted neighborhoods by demolishing decrepit homes.

On the other side, retirees would see cuts to benefits, though some Wall Street creditors will see just a fraction of what they’re owed.

"There is still much work in front of all of us to continue the recovery from a decades-long downward spiral," state-appointed manager Kevyn Orr said in a statement. "We must move swiftly to emerge from bankruptcy so that the financial distress harming the City can end.

"We maintain that the Plan provides the best path forward for all parties to resolve their respective issues and for Detroit to become once again a city in which people want to invest, live and work."

The specifics of the plan include:

— Pensions: Police and fire retirees will receive at least 90 percent of their pension after elimination of cost of living allowances. General city retirees would likely receive at least 70 percent.

— Other creditors: Most of the rest, such as bond insurers, will receive about 20 percent of their claims.

— City services: $1.5 billion over 10 years for city infrastructure and technology upgrades, including $500 million to knock down blighted and abandoned properties that are Detroit’s most visible eyesore.


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— The arts: The Detroit Institute of Arts will keep the city-owned art under a deal with the state that relies on money from foundations and private donors. Part of the deal requires Gov. Rick Snyder to get $350 million from the state to help the city’s two pension systems.

The plan still faces numerous obstacles. Most aspects are still being negotiated in mediation sessions with stakeholders. Court appeals are all but certain even after the final version is approved in bankruptcy court.

Orr has said the of the city’s $18 billion in debt, about $12 billion is unsecured, meaning there aren’t taxes or other revenue streams to pay it.

Orr had hoped creditors would sign off on the plan before he submitted it to U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes. But the clock was ticking because Rhodes had set a March 1 deadline. Nevertheless, with negotiations ongoing, changes are expected.

Bankruptcy attorney and St. John’s University law professor Anthony Sabino believes the plan could start an argument over being treated equally between the city’s general workers and retirees and police and firefighters.

"It’s intriguing Mr. Orr wants to have the firefighters and police have 90 percent and other city workers cut back to two-thirds," Sabino said Friday. "The other unions will say ‘even if we’re uneven, we should be closer.’ It does create an inequity that is going to have to be addressed in court."



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