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House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, arrives at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013. Heat is building on balkanized Republicans, who are convening the House this weekend in hopes of preventing a government shutdown but remain under tea party pressure to battle on and use a must-do funding bill to derail all or part of President Barack Obama's health care law. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)
Deadline nearing, GOP seeks health care delay
First Published Sep 28 2013 04:00 pm • Last Updated Sep 28 2013 03:59 pm

WASHINGTON • Locked in a deepening struggle with President Barack Obama, House Republicans on Saturday demanded a one-year delay in major parts of the nation’s new health care law and permanent repeal of a tax on medical devices as the price for preventing a partial government shutdown threatened for early Tuesday.

Senate Democrats rejected the plan even before the House could post it online for the public. The White House followed quickly with a statement saying that "any member of the Republican Party who votes for this bill is voting for a shutdown."

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Undeterred, House Republicans pressed ahead with their latest attempt to squeeze a concession from the White House in exchange for letting the government open for business normally on Tuesday. They also agreed to pass legislation assuring U.S. troops are paid in the event of a shutdown.

"I think we have a winning program here," said Rep. Hal Rogers, R-Ky., chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, after days of discord that pitted Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and his leadership against tea party-backed conservatives.

Apart from its impact on the health care law, the legislation that House Republicans decided to back would assure routine funding for government agencies through Dec. 15.

The measure marked something of a reduction in demands by House Republicans, who passed legislation several days ago that would permanently strip the health care law of money while providing funding for the government.

It also contained significant concessions from a party that long has criticized the health care law for imposing numerous government mandates on industry, in some cases far exceeding what Republicans have been willing to support in the past.

GOP aides said that under the legislation headed toward a vote, portions of the health law that already have gone into effect would remain unchanged. That includes requirements for insurance companies to guarantee coverage for pre-existing conditions and to require children to be covered on their parents’ plans until age 26. It would not change a part of the law that reduces costs for seniors with high prescription drug expenses.

Instead, the measure would delay implementation of a requirement for all individuals to purchase coverage or face a penalty, and of a separate feature of the law that will create marketplaces where individuals can shop for coverage from private insurers.

By repealing the medical device tax, the GOP measure also would raise deficits — an irony for a party that won the House majority in 2010 by pledging to get the nation’s finances under control.


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The Senate rejected the most recent House-passed anti-shutdown bill on a party-line vote of 54-44 Friday, insisting on a straightforward continuation in government funding without health care-related add-ons.

That left the next step up to the House — with time to avert a partial shutdown growing ever shorter.

The White House statement, issued in the name of press secretary Jay Carney, said, "It’s time for the House to listen to the American people and act, as the Senate has, in a reasonable way to pass a bill that keeps the government running and move on."

In his statement, Reid noted that Obama has said previously he would veto measures delaying the health care law. "The American people will not be extorted by tea party anarchists," he said.

For a moment at least, the revised House proposal papered over a simmering dispute between the leadership and tea party conservatives who have been more militant about abolishing the health law that all Republicans oppose.

It was unclear whether members of the rank and file had consulted with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who has become the face of the "Defund Obamacare" campaign that tea party organizations are promoting and using as a fundraising tool.

Instead, House Republican moderates and conservatives said it soon would be up to Reid and fellow Democrats to decide whether the government would remain open past the shutdown deadline of midnight Monday.

Asked if the House measure would risk a shutdown, Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., said, "It depends on how long ... Reid wants to continue to be financially irresponsible and obstructionist."

Said Rep. Charles Dent, R-Pa.: "Once this passes the House, the Senate’s going to have to make a decision. Will they move quickly or will they dawdle?"

Left unspoken was how the House would respond if the Senate rejected the measure and insisted once more on a bill with no extraneous items.

There was little doubt that Reid had the votes to block a one-year delay in the health care program widely known as "Obamacare."

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