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Family genealogy spared in house fire

Published October 19, 2010 6:22 pm

Wellsville • Room in home was only one that didn't burn.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2010, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

A fire that consumed most of a Wellsville home on Saturday reignited early Monday morning but spared at least one family treasure.

Matt Leishman said he was surprised to go through the rubble of his parents' home Monday afternoon and find one room that was virtually untouched — the one containing many years' worth of his mother's family genealogical records.

The family was able to fully recover all the documents related to the family history, although some were soaked with water.

"The only thing I can say is, God was watching that room," Leishman said Tuesday. "Because, for some reason, that room didn't burn. All the rooms around it were burned."

The fire first broke out around 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at the home near 400 North and 750 East.'

The home was fully engulfed in flames when fire crews arrived.

"They [the Wellsville Fire Department] had been through the home several times on Sunday, looking for hot spots, and didn't find any and were monitoring it," said Logan City Fire Marshal Craig Humphreys.

But the fire reignited around 4 a.m. Monday morning, Humphreys said, and was put out again.

The family was allowed back in Monday afternoon to search for valuables.

"They allowed us to get a few things, clothes and jewelry and other things that were important," Leishman said.

Officials believe the blaze may have been caused by a bad valve or faulty hose connected to the propane tank on a gas grill near the back of the home.

Leishman said the family has insurance and plans to rebuild on the same site. In the meantime, Leishman said his parents are staying with other family members.

There were no injuries reported.

The community has been quick to lend help by bringing food to the family— so much that it couldn't be contained in a refrigerator, so a neighbor gave them another one.

"We have got people here in town that have offered help to get rubble and things out of the house. That is why I love living here — people pull together," Leishman said.

A fund has been set up at Zions Bank to help the Leishman family.