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This image released by Open Road Films shows director Robert Rodriguez, left, with actor Mel Gibson on the set of "Machete Kills." (AP Photo/Open Road Films, Rico Torres)
Plea to take Mel Gibson off ‘blacklist’ sparks Hollywood debate

First Published Mar 18 2014 11:10 am • Last Updated Mar 21 2014 03:08 pm

Eight years after Mel Gibson’s anti-Semitic rant during a drunk-driving arrest, Hollywood is debating the rehabilitation of an Oscar winner who was once one of the industry’s most bankable stars.

The heated discussion was sparked by a March 12 opinion piece in Deadline Hollywood by Allison Hope Weiner, a freelance writer who covered Gibson’s infamous spiral out of favor and now considers him a friend. Her appeal for an end to what she called a "quiet blacklisting" has generated more than 5,700 comments on Yahoo.com’s movie page and more than 800 on the Deadline Hollywood site, which is read by many in the industry.

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"He has been in the doghouse long enough," Weiner wrote. "It’s time to give the guy another chance."

Gibson’s movies, from "Mad Max" to "Braveheart" and "Apocalypto," have grossed $3.6 billion, according to Rentrak Corp., providing an incentive for studios and agencies to consider absolution. His particular transgressions, and the number of them over the years, mean it’s unlikely to come easy.

Forgiving Gibson "is not the same thing as forgiving Lindsay Lohan for partying too late," said Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of "Starstruck: The Business of Celebrity" and an associate professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. "Anti-Semitism is not just behaving badly."

While the 58-year-old still directs and acts — he recently completed production as a co-star with Sylvester Stallone on "Expendables 3" — major studios "are either wary of him or prefer not to work with him," said Michael Fleming, Deadline Hollywood’s film editor. "I am surprised this has lasted this long. The guy has made a lot of people a lot of money."

The back-and-forth by commentators on Weiner’s piece boils down to a bygone question in Hollywood: whether what someone says or does off screen, however repugnant, should have any effect on his fitness to make movies.

Gibson is a long-running case in point. The hits to his reputation aren’t limited to those from his tirade about Jews being "responsible for all the wars in the world," delivered as he was arrested in 2006 in Malibu, Calif. In 2010, audiotapes of threats he made to his then-girlfriend, Oksana Grigorieva — laced with racial epithets — surfaced. The next year he pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor battery charge after a dispute with Grigorieva, the mother of his youngest child.

In 2004, he came under fire for what the Anti-Defamation League and others saw as anti-Semitism in "The Passion of the Christ," a blockbuster he directed, co-produced and co-wrote. He reacted to a Frank Rich column about it in the New York Times by telling the New Yorker, "I want to kill him. I want his intestines on a stick. I want to kill his dog."

In 1992 he offended the gay community with remarks in a Spanish newspaper interview and later told Playboy that he would apologize "when hell freezes over."


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He did apologize after his Malibu arrest for what he said were his "vitriolic and harmful words," and after pleading no contest to a misdemeanor drunk-driving charge was sentenced to three years’ probation.

Alan Nierob, a Rogers & Cowan publicist who represents Gibson, said his client should be allowed back in the fold. "People should know that he is now healthy once again, both physically and mentally after suffering a breakdown," Nierob said. "He is an artistic genius, and the industry should benefit once again from his enormous talent."

Weiner, describing herself as an observant Jew, said in Deadline Hollywood that Gibson today "is clearly a different man, one who has worked on his sobriety since that awful night in Malibu." And the movie industry, she said, is hypocritical, willing to "work with others who’ve committed felonies and done things far more serious than Gibson."

She cited Mike Tyson, a convicted rapist who has been in the "Hangover" films. Gibson was dropped from a cameo in "The Hangover Part II" in 2010 after "a lot of people" working on the film protested, Todd Phillips told the Hollywood Reporter.

"Gibson has been shunned not for doing anything criminal; his greatest offenses amount to use of harsh language," Weiner wrote in her more than 3,400-word piece. She said she chose to publish it on the 10th anniversary of "The Passion of the Christ," which she described as "about an innocent man’s willingness to forgive the greatest injustice."

The independent release grossed $612 million at the global box office, and Gibson personally made $210 million in 2004, according to Forbes. His fortune was estimated at $850 million by the Los Angeles Business Journal, and People magazine reported that his 2011 divorce halved that.

In recent years, Weiner said, Gibson has befriended rabbis, attended Passover Seders and donated to Jewish causes. He invited to coffee the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputy who took him into custody in Malibu. He was at Weiner’s son’s bar mitzvah, where she said he charmed her family.

"My friendship with Gibson made me reconsider other celebrities whose public images became tarnished by the media’s rush to judge," Weiner wrote. "Whether it’s Gibson, Tom Cruise or Alec Baldwin, the descent from media darling to pariah can happen quickly after they do something dumb."

Hollywood is littered with stars who fell from grace — Charlie Sheen after a rant against the producer of "Two and a Half Men," Robert Downey Jr. after arrests for illegal drug use, Cruise after jumping on Oprah’s couch and admonishing Brooks Shields for treating her postpartum depression with pharmaceuticals — and who bounced back.

Downey, Gibson’s co-star in "Air America" in 1990, has been among his staunch defenders. He asked that Gibson be onstage to present him with a life-achievement award from American Cinematheque in 2011, and said in his acceptance speech that his friend deserved from Hollywood the same forgiveness it had afforded him. Gibson had helped revive Downey’s career when he was considered uninsurable by paying his insurance bond for 2003’s "The Singing Detective."

Gibson rose to international fame with the "Mad Max" and "Lethal Weapon" films and won Oscars in 1995 for best picture and best director for "Braveheart," in which he also starred. He garnered acclaim for "Apocalypto," about the end of Mayan civilization, which he financed through his Icon Productions; Walt Disney Co. distributed it.

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