Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Pink Champagne cocktails are the drink of choice in 1957’s “An Affair to Remember.” Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr quaff them during their shipboard romance, with the pink, or rose, Champagne symbolizing a carefree attitude. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
Recipes: Movie cocktails that leave us shaken and stirred
First Published Feb 25 2014 09:32 am • Last Updated Feb 25 2014 08:30 pm

James Bond without his martini? "The Big Lebowski" dude without his White Russian? Unthinkable.

You won’t see any "Best Supporting Drink" in this year’s Academy Awards ceremonies Sunday, but cocktails play a major role in movies, serving as props, symbols and reflections of what’s going on behind the scenes.

Photos
At a glance

Blood and Sand

In the 1922 silent classic “Blood and Sand,” Rudolph Valentino stars as a bullfighter torn between his childhood love and a seductive widow. In this cocktail, scotch is the “sand,” while cherry brandy and vermouth are the “blood.”

Ice

1 ounce blended Scotch whisky

1 ounce orange juice

1 ounce Cherry Heering (cherry liqueur)

1 ounce sweet vermouth

Amarena cherry, to garnish

Fill a coupe glass with ice to chill. In an ice-filled shaker, combine all ingredients except the cherry, then shake for about 15 seconds. Empty the ice from the glass and strain the cocktail into it. Garnish with the cherry.

Source: Recipe adapted from Erica Duecy’s “Storied Sips.”

Pink Champagne

In 1957’s “An Affair to Remember,” Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr drink Champagne cocktails while falling in love at sea.

1 sugar cube

3 dashes Angostura bitters

1 ounce brandy

5 ounces chilled Champagne or rose Champagne

Orange twist, to garnish

Place the sugar cube in a Champagne flute, then sprinkle the bitters onto it. Add the brandy and Champagne, then top with an orange twist.

Start to finish » 10 minutes

Servings » 1

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

"The thing about cocktails, is they’re about what’s going on in time and the media and actually they create a timeline," says Cheryl Charming, a New Orleans-based bar manager who tracks the history of movie drinks on her website, MissCharming.com.

Charming’s list starts all the way back in 1917 with the Charlie Chaplin film "The Adventurer," in which he makes what appears to be a whiskey and soda. Exact method: Squirting the soda in the bottle, drinking from the bottle, then using the glass as an ashtray.

Hopefully, that didn’t start a trend.

But another old-time classic, the 1922 silent movie "Blood and Sand," did make an impression on the bar scene, writes cocktail historian Erica Duecy in her book, "Storied Sips." The movie helped make a star of Rudolph Valentino — also known as The Great Lover — and one of the screen’s first sex symbols. Valentino played a poor boy who grew up to become one of the greatest matadors in Spain and is torn between his wife, a friend from childhood, and a wealthy widow. (There was a 1941 remake starring Tyrone Power.)

Valentino, known for his elegant good looks, leaned toward macho roles as a kind of counterbalance and the Blood and Sand cocktail, which first appears in the 1930 "Savoy Cocktail Book," is a mix of masculine-feminine. There’s rugged scotch, the sand-colored spirit, mixed with a fruity cherry brandy and sweet vermouth, the "blood" side of things.

The result, writes Duecy, is "more than the sum of its parts, a smoldering, luscious cocktail that seduces on the first sip."

Sometimes the movies show us how to make a cocktail, as in the ’80s romantic drama "Cocktail," in which Tom Cruise shows off his mad bartending skills. Or there’s the 1934 movie "The Thin Man," in which William Powell explains the science of shaking.

"My favorite line, which Nick delivers to a crew of white-vested bartenders," says Duecy, "is ‘The important thing is to always have rhythm in your shaking. A Manhattan you shake to foxtrot time. A Bronx to two-step time. A dry martini you always shake to waltz time.’ "


story continues below
story continues below

The cult classic "The Big Lebowski," released in 1998, has amassed loyal fans, many of whom have adopted the White Russian — vodka, coffee liqueur and cream or milk — favored by the film’s protagonist, played by Jeff Bridges.

Of course, one of the most famous cocktails in movie history is the vodka martini that appeared in the first James Bond movie, 1962’s "Dr. No." "Americans didn’t drink vodka back then," says Charming. "All of a sudden, sales soared."

Years later, when Pierce Brosnan’s version of Bond ordered a mojito in the 2002 movie "Die Another Day," Charming found that "people were walking into bars saying, ‘Can I get a mojito?’ And none of the bars had mint," she adds with a laugh.

And pink Champagne cocktails are the drink of choice in 1957’s "An Affair to Remember." Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr quaff them during their shipboard romance, with the pink, or rose, Champagne symbolizing a carefree attitude.

Looking to try some silver screen sips? Here’s a recipe for a Champagne cocktail — we’ve used a version that includes a splash of brandy — as well as a recipe for Blood and Sand.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.