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Charlie Trotter redefined fine dining, dies at 54

First Published Nov 05 2013 12:36PM      Last Updated Nov 05 2013 09:01 pm
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Meanwhile, chefs such as Achatz — of award-winning Chicago restaurants Alinea and Next — became so avant-garde, Trotter’s menus seem almost dated. And the very organic and seasonal philosophies he’d spearheaded had become commonplace.

In 2012 — and in keeping with his reputation for bold, unexpected moves — Trotter closed his iconic 120-seat restaurant. His plan? Return to college to study philosophy.

"The one thing it will do for me is let me wipe a certain slate clean. And while I’m studying and reading and applying myself to something else, if I decide to come back to the restaurant world, I think I’m going to bring a different perspective," he told The Associated Press in an interview last year.



"My hope is to really learn how to think very differently on the whole thing," he said.

Van Aken said it was a shame the public rarely saw other sides of Trotter’s personality — the wit that drove him to share video clips of W.C. Fields, his reenactments of scenes from "The Godfather," his love of Miles Davis.

In a behind-the-scenes look for the AP three days before closing night, the Charlie Trotter’s staff held a typically detail-laden pre-dinner meeting, discussing specifics down to the exact dates when diners last ate at the restaurant and reminders about when to use certain wine glasses.

Dishes from the final week of menus included poached white asparagus with charred broccolini, manchego cheese and red pepper essence and root beer leaf ice cream with vanilla cremeaux and birch syrup-infused meringue.

Some might have thought the move from the restaurant world was too risky. Not Trotter.

"What’s the worst that could happen? Life’s too short. You may be on this planet for 80 years at best or who knows, but you can’t just pedal around and do the same thing forever," he told the AP in 2012.

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AP Food Editor J.M. Hirsch is based in Concord, N.H.

 

 

 

 

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