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Your doubts are legit, age not withstanding
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Dear Carolyn • Our daughter, 25, has started seeing a man 16 years her senior. Yes, do the math, he's 41. I'm 51. Am I crazy to feel this is just not right? The man's last girlfriend was also in her 20s, and most of his "crowd" is just as young. My daughter's answers to this are, "He's young at heart; he had a rough time and made changes when he reached his 30s; he's a good man." My husband and I have serious doubts. I think even if he were much closer in age, those same doubts would be there. Yes, we raised our daughter to be smart, successful, caring and open-minded. And she is. We've talked about this issue a few times. Each of us shedding a few tears. I just can't find it in my heart to accept him. She says she has a hard time understanding where I'm coming from. She doesn't come over to the house with him. I feel the distance between us widening and I'm just a wreck. I don't want to be a hypocrite and say I'm OK with the relationship when I'm not. How do I get past this?

Is Age Really Just a Number

Dear Just a Number • Whether age is "really just a number" is a legitimate and interesting question, but not the one I'd be asking here. You veer that way yourself: You suspect having doubts "even if he were much closer in age." Yes, exactly — because the doubts aren't about his age per se. His age triggered your "ick" reflex because it's close to yours, a normal reaction you need to acknowledge then get over, because adults are adults and love is love. The doubts, though, you take seriously, because this might not be love. His back story — young girlfriends, young friends, the "young at heart" coffee-expeller — suggests he's seeking comfort in your daughter's demographic versus seeking an equal in your daughter. It's unsettling for anyone to see a loved one targeted instead of appreciated, be it for age or income or ethnicity or whatever else. So act first, and "get past this" later. Namely, speak up again — but with careful respect for your daughter's autonomy and judgment. Your bobbled first tries likely motivated her to dig in to defend her judgment.

Carolyn Hax's column runs Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

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