Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Gallery: ’Breaking Bad’ is ending run still looking good


< Previous Page


But in 2001, he found movie offers drying up, and, though he had never seen TV in his future, he gratefully accepted a call from the NBC series "Ed."

The timing was terrific. For decades, TV’s hasty, assembly-line production schedule proved an obstacle to giving a series its own visual style.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

"Film had been just a way to record the TV picture," Slovis said. A further barrier to getting too creative was the low resolution and squarish shape of the old TV receivers, which conversely had a negative impact on theatrical films, whose wide-screen format was forced to conform (with lots of medium and close-up shots) to movies’ eventual small-screen telecast.

Slovis hails pioneering exceptions such as "Twin Peaks," "Law & Order" and "The X-Files" and credits "CSI" as "one of the first times that cinematography became a real character on a show. TV began changing around us."

Gilligan agreed that "the advent of flat-screen TV really allowed Michael’s work to shine in a way it wouldn’t have 20 years ago."

Now the end of "Breaking Bad" is nigh. But through Sunday’s final fade-out, Slovis’ influence will remain, capturing the "Bad" times you can’t turn your eyes from. He’s a series star who’s out of sight, yet controlling what you see.

———

Online:

http://www.amctv.com

———


story continues below
story continues below

EDITOR’S NOTE — Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at fmoore(at)ap.org and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.