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Former Utah Marine starts East Millcreek fitness center
New studio » Trainer not into ‘high-risk, high-reward’ mentality.


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But the maxim also applies to his training ethic. While all the workouts are designed to build core strength and lean muscle, he is big on safety so that a member’s new strength is sustainable.

"I’m not about high-risk, high reward," he said.

At a glance

Help for veteran entrepreneurs

The Veterans Administration has programs to encourage veterans to start businesses and gives vets preference for government contracts, although Josiah Schultz did not use those to start 212 Fitness.

Loans for veterans are available through the Small Business Administration’s SBA’s Patriot Express Pilot Loan Initiative, www.sba.gov/content/express-programs.

Hitting 212: A Company Statement

The name of the new fitness studio — 212 Fitness — comes from the boiling temperature of water: 212 degrees.

“At 211 degrees, water is hot. At 212 degrees it boils. … Just one degree is transformational. This is the foundation of everything we do at 212, because we believe that one extra degree of effort makes all the difference.”

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His main goal is to help people be fit for everyday life, which in Utah often includes skiing, biking, climbing and running.

"People are realizing that their health is about more than running on a treadmill at a big box that charges $10 a month," said Schultz.

Anabel Greenlee, who is in Schultz’s 6 a.m. class several times a week, said she appreciates his attention to safety and his ability to tailor the workouts.

"We cross-country ski, hike, snowshoe, but … I can’t do everything a 30-year-old can do," said Greenlee, who is 69 and has arthritis in her knees.

"He’s good about saying, ‘Instead of jumping jacks, do toe raises. Instead of squat jumps, do this.’ I’m able to keep up."

One of her motivations is to avoid what happened to her mother, who lived into her 90s, but died after falling on stairs because she lacked the strength to hold onto the railing.

Smith, 56, said that after a year of training with Schultz, he still has sore muscles at times, a sign that his fitness is still improving.

"Josiah," he said, "has gotten me in better shape than I’ve ever been in my life."


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kmoulton@sltrib.com



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