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Make a weeknight impression with puff pastry tart

Published October 10, 2012 2:47 pm

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This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Weeknight cooking generally is utilitarian. It may not be very pretty or impressive, but it usually is tasty and gets the job done.

Which tends to throw everything for a loop on those rare weeknights when something special is needed. Just because you need to feed last minute company on a Wednesday evening doesn't mean you magically have extra time to pull it off. Those are the nights when we need something that is impressive and delicious, as well as easy and speedy.

For nights such as this, keep a couple packages of puff pastry in the freezer. This versatile dough is delicious, inexpensive and cooks in minutes. It can be used for desserts or savory dishes, and is agreeable to any shape you care to fold, mold or cut it into.

Puff pastry is just what the name implies — a pastry-style dough that, because of the layers of fat worked into it, puffs when baked. The result is a light and delicately crunchy pastry (think croissant).

Most grocers sell puff pastry in the freezer section alongside the phyllo dough, fruits and other pastry items. The most common brand is Pepperidge Farm, which comes as a 17.3-ounce package that contains two sheets of pastry. Each sheet is packed folded into thirds and must be thawed before unfolding.

While there are innumerable ways of transforming puff pastry into wonderful desserts, I prefer to use it as the base of savory tarts. To do this, simply thaw and unfold a sheet of pastry, set it on a lightly oiled baking sheet, then top it with thinly sliced vegetables or meat and bake until puffed and lightly browned.

I recently topped a tart with chopped canned artichoke hearts, fresh thyme, minced garlic and a whole mess of grated Parmesan cheese. I've also done pizza-like versions, topping the pastry with sliced tomatoes, garlic, basil and fresh mozzarella.

As a general rule, it's best to choose toppings that need little cooking time or already are cooked. Puff pastry cooks quickly, so you want to make certain your toppings don't take longer than the pastry. —

Puff pastry pissaladier

1 sheet frozen puff pastry (each 17.3-ounce package contains 2 sheets), thawed according to package directions

2 roasted red peppers, drained

1 (2-ounce) tin oil-packed anchovy fillets, well drained

Ground black pepper

1/4 cup chopped Kalamata olives

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Heat oven to 425 degrees. Lightly coat a baking sheet with cooking spray.

Unfold the thawed sheet of puff pastry and set on the prepared baking sheet.

Use paper towels to pat dry the roasted red peppers, removing as much moisture as possible without mashing the peppers. Cut the peppers into thin strips, then arrange evenly over the pastry.

Arrange the anchovies over the red peppers, spacing them evenly to cover the tart. Season tart with black pepper, then sprinkle the chopped olives evenly over the tart. Sprinkle Parmesan cheese evenly over everything.

Bake for 15 minutes, or until pastry is puffed and browned at the edges and cheese is melted and lightly browned. Cut into squares and serve warm or room temperature.

Servings • 6

Source: The Associated Press