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Luxury fashion world tweaking its style for Gen Y



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No decollete and not a lot of leg, either. Attention was drawn upward as one model wore a hand-painted organza scarf with her navy wool suit with black grosgrain detail, and another wore a tweed suit with a fox-fur collar. There was a lovely lilac cashmere kaleidoscope-print scarf that complemented a cropped purple-wool jacket and slim silk mikado pant.

Herrera went with a more architectural silhouette than a frilly one, but as a seasoned supplier of chic clothes, she moves easily between the two looks. The finale ballgown in bright pink was worn off the shoulder with a folded fabric bodice. A key daytime outfit — something her luxury-seeking customers count on her for — was a navy knit turtleneck with a broadtail-fur (flat lambswool) front and an indigo-colored pencil skirt.

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She featured a series of abstract prints on her eveningwear, which made a statement on the catwalk that might be hard to appreciate in tighter quarters. But, alas, the Herrera woman lives in a world of grand entrances. Herrera loyalist Renee Zellweger once again filled her spot in the front row.

TOMMY HILFIGER

You can convey a refined-yet-sporty elegance with double-breasted coats, suede field jackets and scarf-print silk dresses. Or you could just create an elaborate set for a fashion show with a brick-path runway, park benches and ivy-covered walls. Tommy Hilfiger did both.

Not leaving anything to chance Sunday night, Hilfiger brought the hunt club to Park Avenue, creating a set inside an old armory building that complemented every look worn by the models. There was a lot of oohing and aahing as the often-jaded crowd of stylists, retailers, editors and celebrities — including Uma Thurman — walked in the door.

"The whole message is town and country," Hilfiger said in a pre-show interview. "There are country tweeds and a mix of suedes, leather and quilting. It sort of looks like hunting, but it’s not hunting foxes, it’s hunting for fun."

An uptown element was added through cashmere, fine details such as braiding and a sophisticated color palette rooted in plum, Dijon yellow, navy, dark green and burgundy.

Other than the obvious military references, Hilfiger also hit on a few of the other trends catching on during New York Fashion Week, including high necklines that draw the eye upward, long gloves and tactile fabrics. Of course, he said, it’s all been skewed a little to fit his usual preppy aesthetic.


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