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News roundup: Romney almost passed on White House bid

Published July 8, 2013 8:11 am

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Romney almost passed on White House bid. Immigration debate heads to the House. UTA bonuses add up to $1 million.

Happy Monday. Mitt Romney wasn't sold on running for president, and at one point, was dead set against it. That's according to a new book that says Romney, and several members of his family, had decided against a White House bid. [WaPost]

Topping the news: The battle for immigration reform is far from over. House Republicans are determined not to feel pressure from the Senate to back a proposal that they may not agree with. Utah's three Republican representatives do not support the bill in its current form. [Trib] [Fox13]

-> The UTA paid a total of $1 million in bonuses in 2012 while different services have faced the ax. [Trib]

-> During a radio interview Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Draper, declared his embarrassment over the Utah House's decision to launch an investigation into AG John Swallow. [Trib]

-> A Weber State University student and immigrant says she'd like Sen. Mike Lee to tell her to her face that she doesn't belong in the United States. [StandEx]

Tweet of the day: From @daveweigel: "Given sequestration, shouldn't this fireworks display cut off five minutes early?"

Happy birthday: to Taylorsville City Mayor Jerry Rechtenbach.

Opinion Section: Paul Rolly discusses the conflicting voices of the LDS Church and conservative fundamentalist Phyllis Schlafly in Utah's Republican Party. [Trib]

-> Rolly discusses Morgan Philpot's wife's theory on why Heather Groom defected to Gov. Gary Herbert's camp, the holiday transportation schedules and sprinkler systems. [Trib]

-> A former medical intern at the University of Utah Hospital shares his experience of transitioning from the classroom to the hospital ward. [Trib]

-> A retired psychologist discusses the misuse of science to judge minority groups and others as inferior. [Trib]

-> Pat Bagley gives his take on the current political situation in Egypt. [Trib]

-> A snake relocation expert shares his appreciation of the state's serpents, revealing the benign nature of most of Utah's most feared inhabitants. [Trib]

-> A Writers on the Range contributor was at Telluride's Mountainfilm Festival, where climate change and nuclear power were central topics of discussion. [Trib]

-> George Pyle gives his take on the dismissal of Weber University professor Jared Lisonbee, who voiced his disapproval of the university's choice to name its new family support program after Boyd K. Packer. [Trib]

-> A Utah State University marketing professor and the managing director of Renewable Tech Ventures discuss the potential economic benefits of developing the clean energy sector in Utah. [Trib]

-> A Salt Lake City resident discusses the city's tax increases. [Trib]

-> The president and CEO of Rio Tinto Kennecott thanks his employees, political leaders and the community for their support in the wake of April's mining slide and offers an update on the recovery effort. [Trib]

-> Frank Pignanelli and LaVarr Webb discuss whether America's past or its future is brightest. [DNews]

-> The chief economist for the Salt Lake Chamber talks about the need to narrow the cultural divide in Utah and to nurture compassion and understanding between Mormons and non-Mormons. [DNews]

-> Former Sen. Bob Bennett says the fact President Barack Obama has continued several of George W. Bush's programs means Bush was right in the first place. [DNews]

Weekend in Review: Former state lawmaker Holly Richardson plans to challenge Rep. Brian Greene in 2014. [UtahPolicy]

-> Experts say that ozone pollution — though sometimes invisible — is a significant health hazard, even to those in seemingly robust health. [Trib]

-> Following the Fourth of July celebrations, air pollution levels in Ogden hit nearly 20 times the Clean Air Act standard, and spiked considerably in several other areas. [Trib]

-> As part of her trip to the Utah, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell hiked up Pass Canyon to Barney's Peak with Bureau of Land Management staff, listened to feedback on conservation and resource development and addressed the issue of federal land management. [Trib]

-> Both supporters and critics of the NSA's surveillance programs have found unlikely allies on the other side of the aisle. [Trib]

-> Salt Lake City has missed the deadline to apply for federal funding for the 1100 East streetcar route, an extension of the Sugar House Streetcar line which is due to open in December. [Trib]

-> The Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Nation has sworn in new officers and reelected incumbents for the Tribal Council's 2013-2015 term. [Trib]

-> Seeking a solution to traffic circulation issues, the Salt Lake County Council is planning a comprehensive environmental impact statement on traffic in the central Wasatch Mountains, particularly in Little Cottonwood and Big Cottonwood canyons. [Trib]

-> The Utah Republican Party has named Jeff Peterson as its new executive director. [DNews]

-> The delay until 2015 of the part of the Affordable Care Act that requires large employers to offer health insurance coverage to its employees is likely welcomed by big businesses in Utah, although the postponement is thought to be minimal. [DNews]

-> A quick look back on the Utah House's decision to pursue impeachment hearings against Swallow. [Trib] [DNews] Bob Bernick, meanwhile, says lawmakers understand the real world applications to impeachment. [UtahPolicy]

-> A national business publication has ranked Gov. Gary Herbert as the third best governor for job-creation in the country; North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple and Texas Gov. Rick Perry are the others ahead of Herbert. [DNews]

-> Herbert has chosen two new members for the State Board of Regents to replace outgoing regents Nolan Karras and Marlon Snow. Jesselie Anderson and Joyce Valdez will join the board subject to Utah Senate confirmation. [DNews]

Nationally: Officials have revealed that the NSA has not only been collecting data on Americans to combat terrorism: In more than a dozen classified rulings, the FISA court granted the agency the power to gather intelligence on those suspected of nuclear proliferation, espionage and cyberattacks. [NYTimes]

-> Conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity has spent more than $1 million on an ad campaign to begin airing this week that casts aspersions on President Barack Obama's new health care law. [NYTimes]

-> In remarks that reveal that perhaps Russia is keen to see him gone, a senior member of the Russian Parliament suggested that Edward Snowden take up Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro's offer of asylum. [NYTimes]

-> IRS documents reveal that tea party groups weren't the only ones unfairly targeted. Agents were given a "be on the lookout" list to help determine which groups required closer scrutiny based on key words on their applications. [NYTimes] [WaPost]

-> President Barack Obama is planning to focus on two key issues for the summer - immigration and the economy. [WaPost]

-> According to a Gallup poll released Friday, two thirds of Americans would rather their child did not go into politics as a career. [Gallup] [WaPost]

Where are they?

Rep. Jason Chaffetz returns to Washington for the evening votes.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden receive the presidential daily briefing in the Oval Office.

Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Email us at cornflakes@sltrib.com. If you haven't already, sign up for our weekday email and get this sent directly to your inbox. [Trib]

— Thomas Burr and Isobel MarkhamTwitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/i_markham