Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Utah's Right to Know
Donald Meyers
Donald W. Meyers writes about open-government issues for The Salt Lake Tribune. He is also the site manager of utahsright.com, the Tribune's online database of public records. He is also a member of the Society of Professional Journalists' National Freedom of Information Committee and sits on the board of directors of the Utah Foundation for Open Government.

» E-mail

» Twitter: @donaldwmeyers

» Subscribe (RSS)




Utah’s senators still looking at federal reporter’s shield law

The Senate Judiciary Committee will decide Thursday whether reporters should be able to keep sources confidential without having to go to jail.

The committee is taking up the Free Flow of Information Act, sponsored by Sens. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.; Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina; Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn; and Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. The bill would create a qualified privilege for reporters, allowing them to protect confidential sources of information.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Utah Sens. Orrin G. Hatch and Mike Lee, both Republicans who sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee, haven’t made up their minds yet.

"Senator Lee is still evaluating the law and has not yet made a decision," Brian Phillips, Lee’s communications director.

Hatch spokesman Matthew Harakal said he was not aware of whether the state’s senior senator had taken a position on the bill. He said he was "still taking a look at it."

"We just have to wait and see tomorrow," Harakal said.

The shield law was first proposed in 2006 and again in 2009, but both times it died. This year’s incarnation came after the Justice Department subpoenaed phone records from the Associated Press.

The proposed shield law would be similar to ones in 48 states. The bill would offer journalists a qualified privilege to not disclose confidential sources.

The bill is supported by journalism organizations, including the Society of Professional Journalists and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
 
Jobs
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.