Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Utah's Right to Know
Donald Meyers
Donald W. Meyers writes about open-government issues for The Salt Lake Tribune. He is also the site manager of utahsright.com, the Tribune's online database of public records. He is also a member of the Society of Professional Journalists' National Freedom of Information Committee and sits on the board of directors of the Utah Foundation for Open Government.

» E-mail

» Twitter: @donaldwmeyers

» Subscribe (RSS)




Documents show Hurricane’s payment for Taser death, but still scant details of settlement

Thanks to Utah’s open-records law, we now know how much a Hurricane police officer’s decision to use a Taser on a mentally ill man cost taxpayers.

As Brooke Adams reported, the southern Utah city paid the family of Brian Cardall $2 million to settle the family’s wrongful-death lawsuit against the city. The settlement states that the city does not admit to any liability by making the payment.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

In return, the Cardalls drop their suit against the city, Police Chief Lynn Excell and Officer Kenneth Thompson, who is accused of firing two 50,000-volt charges from his Taser pistol into Cardall, who was unarmed, naked and having a bipolar episode on the side of a southern Utah highway on June 9, 2009.

However, if you’re looking for more details as to whether Thompson was disciplined or if he and his colleagues had to undergo training in dealing with people who are mentally ill or the proper use of "non-lethal" weapons, forget about it. Adams reports that the settlement precludes the parties from discussing any details, only acknowledging that the case was resolved.

The settlement does permit Cardall’s family, including his father, former KSL-TV editorial director Duane Cardall, to continue working with the National Alliance on Mental Illness and police departments on how to help people with mental illness.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
 
Jobs
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.