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Sundance London picks its 14 films

Published March 7, 2012 10:20 am

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

The Sundance Institute's April wingding in London is starting to shape up into something pretty cool.

The Sundance London Film and Music Festival, a four-day extension of the Sundance ideal to the UK, will screen 14 films that played Park City, Utah's, 2012 Sundance Film Festival in January, the institute announced Tuesday.

Here are the 14 titles:

"Chasing Ice" • Jeff Orlowski's documentary that follows the work of photographer James Balog, who travels the world finding photographic evidence of global climate change. Orlowski won the festival's award for cinematography.

"Filly Brown" • A young L.A. rapper (Gina Rodriguez) navigates family troubles and industry double-talk to find her musical voice. Also starring Lou Diamond Phillips and Edward James Olmos; directed by Youssef Delara and Michael D. Olmos.

"Finding North" • A thoughtful documentary that examines the epidemic of hunger in America. Directed by Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush.

"For Ellen" • A rock singer (Paul Dano) fights for joint custody of his young daughter in writer-director So Yong Kim's drama.

"The House I Live In" • Eugene Jarecki's hard-hitting (and Grand Jury Prize-winning) look at the damage done to American society, and families, by 40 years of "The War on Drugs."

"Liberal Arts" • Josh Radnor ("How I Met Your Mother") directs and stars in this romantic comedy, as a 30-year-old who returns to his old college, and sparks a relationship with a student (Elizabeth Olsen).

"Luv" • An 11-year-old (Michael Rainey Jr.) grows up fast when he spends a day with his beloved uncle (Common), who's involved in shady deals on Baltimore's mean streets. Directed by Sheldon Candis; also starring Dennis Haysbert and Danny Glover.

"Nobody Walks" • Writer-director Ry Russo-Young's drama, in which a free-spirited New York artist (Olivia Thirlby) disrupts a California couple (John Krasinski, Rosemarie DeWitt).

"An Oversimplification of Her Beauty" • Terence Nance directs this offbeat film (which premiered in Sundance's New Frontier program), mixing live action and animation to examine Nance's relationship with a young woman that teeters between friendship and love.

"The Queen of Versailles" • Director Lauren Greenfield's controversial documentary, a verite look inside the life of timeshare mogul David Siegel and his free-spending wife Jacqueline, as the family's business faces crisis during the economic downturn.

"Safety Not Guaranteed" • A magazine intern (Aubrey Plaza) makes a connection with a man (Mark Duplass) who claims to have built a time machine, in director Colin Trevorrow's oddball romance. Derek Connolly's script won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at Sundance this year.

"Shut Up and Play the Hits" • The last concert of the groundbreaking band LCD Soundsystem, and frontman James Murphy's first day after, are shown in this documentary.

"2 Days in New York" • Julie Delpy directs and stars in this look at modern romance, playing a Frenchwoman in New York, introducing her parents to her new boyfriend (Chris Rock).

"Under African Skies" • Documentarian Joe Berlinger profiles Paul Simon, concentrating on his collaboration with South African musicians to create his landmark 1986 album "Graceland."

Also on the Sundance London bill are musical performances by Tricky and Placebo, three panel discussions, and appearances by Sundance founder Robert Redford and composer/producer T-Bone Burnett.

Sundance London takes place April 26-29 at the O2 arena in London.