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Meanwhile, on the Internet
Tribune Reporters
'Meanwhile' is a collaborative blog about all the crazy stuff on the Internet. Here, reporters from various Tribune desks tell you what you (almost) need to know about topics ranging from technology to YouTube sensations. Contributors: Jim Dalrymple, Vince Horiuchi, Michael McFall, Dave Newlin, Matt Piper, Brennan Smith, Erin Alberty. Edited by Sheena McFarland.

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Utah reporter who fainted explains her now-famous fall

Brooke Graham figures her now Internet-famous faint will follow her the rest of her life.

"I am never going to live that down," the KUTV reporter said in a video posted to the news show’s website Saturday morning. In it, she explains her fall and clears the air that she is physically fine.

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While doing a live report about cross country skiing at Mountain Dell Golf Course, Graham passed out — and barely missed a beat. She sat right back up and kept the segment going, a recovery that quickly went viral and garnered more than 4.8 million views on Youtube since it went up Dec. 30. Gawker, CNN, CBS and The Today Show picked it up, among others.

"It is really weird to be on the other side, but… people have been really nice," Graham said.

Graham explained that she is sensitive to altitude, plus she was sick that day.

"You know when you get that light headed feeling from that? … So I think those two combined was just not a good mix and it just took me down."

When she came to, she had no idea how she wound up in the snow. But when she saw the camera was still on her, she decided to roll with it. During the follow-up piece, Graham thanked the people she was there to interview for going with it too.

Graham said she is going to have tests done in the next few weeks "to try to nail down exactly what’s going on. [But] as far as we know, I’m totally fine and I’m feeling great."

It’s a good thing she passed out in soft powder, too — most of the time, people who faint hit their heads on the way down, explained Jared Bunch, a cardiologist from Intermountain Medical Center brought onto the follow-up segment.

­— Michael McFall

Twitter: @mikeypanda



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