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The Wave in Utah, Arizona and why hikers don't share their secret places

Published June 26, 2013 10:29 am
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

The Associated Press discovered what a select group of hikers discovered long ago.

The Wave on the Utah-Arizona border is breathtaking. But, while it's not crowded by, say, national park or the mall the Saturday before Christmas standards, there's too many people wanting to hike there for the sensitive and dangerous area to handle. Thus, the Bureau of Land Management has a lottery to determine who gets to hike The Wave.

It's reasonable and heartbreaking at the same time. It's also an example of why I occasionally hear Utah outdoor lovers say something to the effect of, "There's spots in this state I'm never telling anyone about."

A lot of people go into the Utah outdoors for solitude. As we've seen with the Wave, which the AP article describes as growing in popularity since it became a national monument in 2000, protecting something can sometimes bring as much attention to it as promoting it.

— Nate Carlisle

Twitter: @UtahHikes

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