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Green River fishing report - Kelly waxes poetic, talks about pike and has a fun factoid

Published April 9, 2014 12:35 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2014, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Ryan Kelly, the Green River Fly Fisher, obviously had a long winter. Check out his report.

Despite strong snow pack in the Wind River range and a designation as a moderately wet year, the river continues at low flow. This does provide more wading opportunity for anglers using the heal/toe express. Along those lines the amount of traffic, both boat and walking has increased tremendously in the past week. This can mostly be attributed to the large number of Blue Winged Olives that tantalize us with thoughts of rising fish. Much like a great Wasatch powder day (Utah Bucket List reference, check it out), great dry fly days have the power to change lives. There is something powerful when a fish protrudes its snout through the surface tension, gently sips in an artistically impressionistic replica, then displaces the water, causing ripples that ripple our soul. My old friend Tom Nokes used to say, "Nothing mends the soul like the fight of a wild trout, dancing on the end of a fly rod." This momentary connection with nature is transcendent, providing us with both a euphoric and spiritual feeling that makes all our troubles drift away. Now that I have waxed philosophical, I'm going to take that wax and put it on my dry fly (dry fly floatant is generally a silicon/paraffin wax mix), and find a rising trout. The opportunity to find a rising trout on a BWO will last through April and into the first 1/3 of May.

If you tire of the finesse dry fly fishing, there are still more pike than we would like. Two more were caught last week. Just below Bridge Rapid on the left, there is an old fallen tree and a sandy beach. I know of 4 pike caught there just this year. I have started referring to the spot as the "pikeway." If your passing by, check it out, there may be a fish taco opportunity waiting to happen.A fun factoid: Mayflies date back to the carboniferous period. This is the period of time when oil and gas started to form. So fill up with some carboniferous fuel and come mimic a carboniferous bug and catch a not so ancient trout.