Jazz notes: Trey Burke trying to grow through adversity
Jazz notes • Point guard rarely lost in high school or college, so he’s “finding ways to grow as a team.”
Published: April 4, 2014 09:20PM
Updated: April 4, 2014 10:36PM
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Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune Utah Jazz guard Trey Burke (3) fires one over the hands of New Orleans Pelicans guard Brian Roberts (22) during the first half of their game Friday, April 4, 2014 at Energy Solutions Arena.

Trey Burke lost four games as a high-schooler.

He made it to the NCAA title game as a sophomore at Michigan.

So the point guard’s first NBA season has been a change of pace.

“It’s pretty tough,” he said this week. “Coming from college and high school, where you were winning for the most part, and coming and having this type of season is tough. But we’re finding ways to grow as a team.”

The Jazz were 23-52 heading into Friday’s game with the New Orleans Pelicans — a win shy of the low mark in Utah Jazz history.

“When you’re in adversity, you don’t think it’s good to go through it,” Jazz coach Ty Corbin said. “Once you get through it and you finish and you get a chance to reflect back … you understand the lessons you got during those times.”

Burke, who has dealt with adversity in the form of defeat and a broken finger that sidelined him for most of the preseason and the season’s first three weeks, is already trying to take the long view.

“It makes you stronger as a player,” he said. “Things aren’t always glitz and glamour out there on the court. You remember those times.”

Burke has plans for a summer of training, getting stronger, faster and more explosive.

But first he’s looking to close out the season strong.

He’s done that personally. March was the second-best scoring month of his first year; he averaged 12.4 points and shot 39 percent from the field.

Corbin to Clark: Keep shooting

After spending much of the season as one of the team’s inactives, rookie Ian Clark has seen time in six of Utah’s last nine games.

Corbin wants the shooter out of Belmont to remain aggressive.

“That New York game, he missed two and he had a third one and he turned it down,” Corbin said. “If you’re a shooter and you’re open, you have to take it and keep that attitude.”

afalk@sltrib.com

Twitter: @tribjazz