Parents group: How to comply with new Utah cannabis law
As state officials draft new rules, Hope 4 Children With Epilepsy gives parents some early guidance.
Published: March 25, 2014 06:31PM
Updated: March 25, 2014 07:53PM
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Franciso Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune Kyle Sintz of South Jordan shares a light moment with his son Isaac, 7, as they wait for Gov. Gary R. Herbert to sign a ceremonial version of HB105 to legalize the use of nonintoxicating cannabis oil by Utahns with untreatable epilepsy. Families gathered in the Gold Room at the Utah Capitol on Tuesday, March 25, 2014, for the signing. HB105, now called 'Charlee's Law," will go into effect on July 1.

Charlee’s Law doesn’t take effect until July 2, 2014. Until then, here are steps and tips from Hope 4 Children With Epilepsy.

Before applying for a hemp registration card, patients must:

Have tried three treatments for epilepsy under the direction and documentation of a neurologist.

Obtain a letter of recommendation from your neurologist affirming that you have intractable epilepsy and that you may benefit from treatment with hemp extract. You will need a copy of this statement, and the neurologist must electronically submit the statement directly to the Utah Department of Health.

READ MORE: Utah families celebrate passage of cannabis “Charlee’s Law”

Obtain a copy of your most recent neurology records. The neurologist will also need to submit the recent records electronically to the health department to be kept on file.

Obtain a valid photo ID.

Gather proof of Utah residency, as outlined by the Health Department and Department of Public Safety.

Save $400 to pay the hemp extract registration fee.

Finding a cannabis extract

There are cannabis extracts available online and in states where medical marijuana is legal. The non-profit Realm of Caring Foundation in Colorado markets an oil, Alepsia, that purports to meet Utah’s legal standards. There is a waiting list for the oil, and registration information can be found at www.theroc.us.

Utah standards:

All hemp supplements must be tested and issued a certificate of analysis confirming they contain no more than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive chemical in marijuana that gives users a high, and no less than 15 percent cannabidiol (CBD). Products must also contain no other psychoactive ingredients and no pesticides, molds or other impurities.

The certificate of analysis for each batch will be submitted electronically to the Utah health department.

A copy of the certificate must also accompany each bottle of oil dispensed to patients.

Each bottle must be labeled with the producer’s name and location, the chemical composition and batch number.