Quantcast
Home » News
Home » News

'Painful' cold bites down on Midwest

Published January 7, 2014 6:50 am

Weather • Chicago sets record for the date: 16 below.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2014, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Minneapolis • The coldest, most dangerous blast of polar air in decades gripped the Midwest and pushed toward the East and South on Monday, closing schools and day care centers, grounding flights and forcing people to pull their hoods and scarves tight to protect exposed skin from nearly instant frostbite.

Many across the nation's midsection went into virtual hibernation, while others dared to venture out in temperatures that plunged well below zero.

"I'm going to try to make it two blocks without turning into crying man," said Brooks Grace, who was bundling up to do some banking and shopping in downtown Minneapolis, where temperatures reached 23 below, with wind chills of minus 48. "It's not cold — it's painful."

The mercury also dropped into negative territory in Milwaukee, St. Louis and Chicago, which set a record for the date at minus 16. Wind chills across the region were 40 below and colder. Records also fell in Oklahoma, Texas and Indiana.

Forecasters said 187 million people could feel the "polar vortex" by the time it spreads across the country on Monday night and Tuesday.

Highs in the single digits were expected Tuesday in Georgia and Alabama. Subzero wind chills were forecast up and down the coast, including minus 10 in Atlanta and minus 12 in Baltimore. From the Dakotas to Maryland, schools and day-care centers shut down.

"You definitely know when you are not wearing your thermal undergarments," said Staci Kalthoff, who raises cattle with her husband on a farm in Albany, Minn., where the temperature hovered around 24 below zero and winds made it feel like minus 46. Even with nostril-freezing cold, the family still prefers winter over summer.

"You can always put on more layers," she said. "When it gets hot, you can only take off so much."

Several deaths were blamed on the snow, ice and cold since Saturday, including the death of a 1-year-old boy who was in a car that went out of control and collided with a snowplow Monday in Missouri.

It took authorities using 10-ton military vehicles known as "wreckers" until early Monday to clear all the chain-reaction accidents caused when several semi-trailers jackknifed along snowy interstates in southern Illinois. The crash stranded about 375 vehicles, but there were no injuries.

In the eastern United States, temperatures in the 40s and 50s Monday helped melt piles of snow from a storm last week but raised the risk that roads would freeze over as the cold air moved in Monday night, said Bob Oravec of the Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Md. The snap was set to be dramatic; Springfield, Mass., enjoyed 56 degrees Monday morning but faced an overnight low of 6.

More than 3,700 flights were canceled by late Monday afternoon. Airline officials said de-icing fluid was freezing, fuel was pumping sluggishly and ramp workers were having difficulty loading and unloading luggage. JetBlue Airways stopped all scheduled flights to and from New York and Boston on Monday, and Southwest ground to a halt in Chicago.