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It's voters' turn to have their say in local politics

Published November 4, 2013 8:01 pm

Election Day • On the ballot are mayors, councils, $500M school district bond.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Utah voters will cast ballots for city leaders and ballot propositions in hundreds of municipalities on Tuesday, with a race for West Valley City mayor and a half-billion-dollar school bond grabbing the most attention.

Former state budget director Ron Bigelow and West Valley City Councilwoman Karen Lang are battling to lead the state's second-largest city, population 133,000, which has been roiled by controversy over its police department. The winner will succeed Mike Winder, who decided not to run for a second term as mayor.

Jordan School District residents will be voting on the largest bond proposal in Utah history — a request for more than $500 million — to handle the booming student population. The bond would mean a property tax increase of up to $10 monthly for every $100,000 value for homeowners, according to estimates.

Among other issues on the ballot in Utah cities are fire district membership in Taylorsville, public safety bonds in Pleasant Grove, housing density in Saratoga Springs, renewal of an arts and recreation use tax and a property tax bump in Orem and the consolidation of East Carbon and Sunnyside.

Throughout the state, citizens will pick mayors and city council members in the nonpartisan elections. Eleven cities in Salt Lake County have contested races for mayor — Cottonwood Heights, Draper, Herriman, Holladay, Midvale, Sandy, South Jordan, South Salt Lake, Taylorsville, West Jordan and West Valley City.

Outside Salt Lake County, cities with contested races for mayor include Bountiful, Logan, Park City, Provo, Roy, Tooele and St. George.

The terms run four years and begin in January.

pmanson@sltrib.com

Twitter: @PamelaMansonSLC Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Go to vote.utah.gov or contact your city recorder's office for information about polling locations.