Rap Sheet: Batman’s crimes in ‘Dark Knight’
Blog • A tally of the crimes movie characters commit and the sentences they could serve.
Published: October 7, 2013 09:13AM
Updated: October 15, 2013 09:31PM
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| Courtesy Warner Bros. The Dark Knight

Disclaimer: The should not be taken as any form of legal counsel or guidance; there may be errors in interpretation of the law and there may be crimes and violations missing from this list. I am not an officer or an attorney; I am a movie fan with a blog.

I was wrong. I predicted that Bruce Wayne would have grown and committed fewer crimes in “The Dark Knight” than he did during his early days in “Batman Begins.” Yet in the sequel, he is a man acting so far outside the law that he would face at least 112 charges — on top of the 68 he racked up in the first movie — during the course of “The Dark Knight.”

As usual, Wayne’s crimes overseas are not held against him. Otherwise, here you have it — his offenses in his most popular movie, along with how much time he could spend behind bars at the bottom.

Three counts of criminal mischief • He programs The Tumbler to crush part of the parking structure wall and two vehicles.

Two counts of possession of an explosive device • The Tumbler was loaded with two missiles...

Two counts of use of an explosive device • ... that Wayne launches at an office of the parking structure and at a parked car.

Two counts of criminal mischief • The Tumbler destroys the parked car and the office.

Four counts of assault • Wayne assaults people in trying to catch the Scarecrow.

Criminal mischief • Wayne cuts and smashes Scarecrow’s van.

Seven counts of unlawful detention • Wayne ties up the copycat Batmen, Scarecrow and his goons.

Unlawful detention • Wayne leaves a captured Lau tied up outside of Gotham Police Headquarters.

Assault • Wayne knocks out District Attorney Harvey Dent, drags him off…

Unlawful detention • … and locks him inside a closet.

Eight counts of assault • Wayne beats up Sal Maroni’s bodyguards.

Aggravated Assault • Wayne holds Maroni above the street and drops him.

Reckless driving • All of Wayne’s reckless driving in The Tumbler, including driving the wrong way on a road.

Leaving the scene of an accident • Wayne does not stop to leave his information with the garbage truck driver he crashed into.

Possession of an explosive device • The Tumbler has the means to self-destruct in a giant fireball…

Use of an explosive device • ... which Wayne has it do as he continues the chase on the Batpod.

Eleven counts of criminal mischief • Wayne does damage to at least 10 cars as he drives by them on the Batpod…

Eleven counts of leaving the scene of an accident • … and does not stop to leave his information.

Three counts of possession of an explosive device • The Batpod is equipped with at least three missiles...

Three counts of use of an explosive device • … which he uses to blow up three parked cars.

Three counts of criminal mischief • Those parked cars are fairly well damaged, if not completely destroyed.

Discharge of a firearm • Wayne fires the machines guns equipped to the Batpod in a public place.

Criminal mischief • Wayne uses the automatic weapons to damage glass doors and drives through them.

Possession of an explosive device • The Batpod is equipped with at least one more missile…

Use of an explosive device • … which he uses on property in an alley way.

Criminal mischief • The property in the alley way seems fairly well trashed.

Four counts of criminal mischief • He destroys three light posts in flipping the Joker’s semi-truck, as well as damaging the semi-truck itself.

Aggravated Assault • Wayne knocks Joker’s head into a table, punches his hand, grabs him and drags him across the table, slams him into the wall, flips and slams him into the table, smashes his head into the glass, punches him in the face twice, picks him and throws him onto the ground.

Reckless driving • Wayne shows disregard for the rules of the road driving to save Rachel Dawes.

Reckless driving • Wayne speeds and frequently changes lanes without signaling when he’s in the Lamborghini.

(You might noticed the absence of the sonar machine hereabouts on this in this list — I could not find what statute, if any, the machine breaks; if you find one, let me know)

Six counts of assault • Wayne assaults six “clown” hostages.

Assault of an officer • Wayne assaults a SWAT team officer with his zip line.

Three counts of assault • He assaults at least three more Joker goons.

Two counts of assault of an officer • Wayne assaults two SWAT team officers.

Four counts of possession of an explosive device • Wayne has at least four explosive gels in his launcher.

Four counts of the use of an explosive device • Which he sticks on support pillars and times them to go off, which they do.

Criminal mischief • He damages part of the Prewitt Building by detonating the gels.

Four counts of assault on an officer • He assaults at least four more SWAT team officers.

Failure to obey the command of an officer • The SWAT team tells Wayne to get on his knees, put his hands in the air and step away from the edge. He only puts his hands in the air.

Five counts of unlawful detention • He forces five SWAT officers to dangle off the side of the building where they are unable to get themselves free.

Unlawful detention • Same goes for The Joker.

Failure to stop at the command of an officer • Wayne does not stop after police command him to, and instead drives off into the night on the Batpod.

Yet near the end, James Gordon Jr. says “He didn’t do anything wrong.” No wonder that kid grows up to be a sociopath in the comics.

If Wayne was tried and convicted on all counts, the judge could sentence him up to 395 years imprisonment, plus 10 life sentences. He could also be fined up to $431,500.

If you add that to his charges from “Batman Begins,” he could serve up to 726 years, plus 15 life sentences, as well as pay $734,000 in fines. Then again, Wayne did say he was going to tell everyone this was all Alfred Pennyworth’s idea.

The case against Wayne only builds with “The Dark Knight Rises” still ahead of him. And as a friend of mine put it, he has a “flying death machine” in that one. When all is said and done, what will be the final tally for all of Wayne’s crimes across the trilogy? Tune in next week— same Bat-time, same Bat-blog.

Until then, we also have a special bonus round of Rap Sheet coming out tomorrow: The Joker’s crimes. Let’s just say he puts Wayne’s prison time to shame.

Think this list is incomplete or that Wayne is wrongly accused? Flex your attorney muscles in the comments section below.

-Michael McFall