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Salt Lake City's Sage's Cafe changing location

Published September 25, 2013 6:10 pm

Dining • Last day of operation is Sunday, Sept. 29
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Sage's Cafe is moving from its founding location to a new home at 234 W. 900 South, Salt Lake City.

The restaurant's last day of service at 473 E. 300 South will be Sunday, Sept. 29.

It will reopen the first week of November at the new location, which was previously the Jade Cafe.

Owner Ian Brandt said he was forced to move because the landlord — who operate Dick and Dixies bar next door — would not allow Sage's to renew its lease.

Despite the hassle, Brandt, who also operates Vertical Diner, Cafe SuperNatural and Cali's Natural Foods, sees the move as an opportunity.

"We are excited to relocate to a larger space that can host special events for speakers, music, multi-media arts, culinary events, community events, classes, wine tastings and so much more," he said in a recent news release.

Sage's joins a few other restaurants and bars in Salt Lake City's Central 9th business district including No Brow Coffee Works, Aroy-D Thai and Try-Angles.

While Sage's Café will keep most of its classic vegetarian and vegan dishes such as the carrot butter pate, shiitake escargot and mushroom stroganoff, the relocation allows Brandt to change the menu to include more eclectic flavors.

Because the move had to be done quickly, Brandt said remodeling the interior and exterior of the restaurant will be a work in progress. He also hopes to get a full-service liquor license that will allow him to sell cocktails and spirts in addition to wine and beer.

Brandt said the grape vines, which were planted 15 years ago when the restaurant first opened, will be cut back so that the outdoor metal work can be taken to the new location. However some of the cuttings will be saved over the winter to plant next year.

kathys@sltrib.com