News roundup: The nine questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask
Published: September 6, 2013 05:50AM
Updated: September 6, 2013 05:50AM

Nine questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask. AG's office hands over UTA investigation. Sugar House streetcar line to open in December.

Happy Friday. Want to sound smart when talking about Syria but still aren't sure where that country is on the map? The Washington Post has you covered. A country defined by European powers long-ago has been fighting a civil war for some two years but the new threat of its domestic chemical warfare has put it on the world stage. Here are the nine questions about the country you may want to know: [WaPost].

Topping the news: The Utah Attorney General's Office has turned over the investigation involving a development near Draper's FrontRunner Station because of a possible conflict of interest with former Attorney General Mark Shurtleff. [Trib] -> The Sugar House streetcar line, or "S line" is completed, costing $37 million and scheduled to open in December. [Trib] [DNews]

-> Drug screening for welfare applicants saved the state money but critics are skeptical of the data. [Trib]

Tweets of the day: From @HuntsmanAbby: "Interesting to note in Dec. most Americans (63%) were supportive of action if Syria used chemical weapons. Today it's almost the opposite."

From @baseballot: "Every local paper right now: [State] House delegation skeptical of use of military force in Syria."

From @juliussharpe: "I hate when my congressman emails me to 'take action' on an issue. Dude, you're the one in congress, you do something."

Happy birthday: Today to state Rep. David Lifferth and West Virginia's newest teenager Hayley Lewis, and on Saturday to former state Rep. Fred Hunsaker and KUED's Ken Verdoia.

In other news: Sen. Mike Lee might support a proposal would narrowly define what a journalist is, and limit protection to bloggers and amateur journalists. [Trib]

-> The Ashley and Uinta-Wasatch-Cache national forests are looking for residents to serve on their resource advisory committees. [DNews]

-> Paul Rolly again goes after Sen. Mike Lee, saying his pleas for donations are getting more shrill. [Trib]

-> State Sen. Stuart Reid says the new school grading system will ultimately help minority students. [UtahPolicy]

-> Bob Bernick and Bryan Schott talk about the new school grading system and the County My Vote fundraising in their weekly videocast. [UtahPolicy]

-> Bernick notes, though, that Count My Votes' real effort begins after the group has turned in the required signatures to change the state's election system. [UtahPolicy]

-> West Valley City's new police chief, Lee Russo, speaks out about his new job. [Fox13]

Nationally: President Barack Obama arrives in Russia for G-20 summit where he hopes to urge allies to back military action against Syria. [WaPost]

-> With Syria now in the mix, Obama's political capital with Congress is spread thin. [Politico]

-> The United States sees no viable path on Syria with the U.N. Security Council because of veto power of Russia and China. [Reuters]

-> More Americans are giving up their citizenship to avoid complicated taxes. [CNN]

-> One of Saddam Hussein's former guns is being put up for auction. [WaPost]

Where are they?

Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Email us at cornflakes@sltrib.com. If you haven't already, sign up for our weekday email and get this sent directly to your inbox. [Trib]

-- Thomas Burr and Jordan Bailey Twitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/thejordanbailey