Quantcast
Home » News
Home » News

Tribune Choice Awards: Arts and culture

Published September 5, 2013 4:03 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

You voted, and the results are in.

Allow us to introduce winners of The Salt Lake Tribune Choice Awards — your picks for the best Utah has to offer in arts and culture. Tribune editors weighed in as well, with their own selections in each category.

Did fellow readers get it right? Did we?

Performing arts groups

People's Choice

Winner

Utah Symphony | Utah Opera • Music director Thierry Fischer is really starting to put his stamp on the Utah Symphony, instituting major seasonlong concert programs that highlight great composers (such as last season's inclusion of all five of Mendelssohn's symphonies, or the "Tchaikovsky Celebration"). Meanwhile, the pops programs continue to make orchestral music accessible to the masses, as they did with retrospectives this year of John Williams and recent Broadway musicals. And Utah Opera mounts productions that would be impressive in cities twice our size.

First runner-up

Ballet West • (See Editors' Choice.)

Second runner-up

Salt Lake Acting Company • The three-headed monster of Utah theater groups. Do you like it for the challenging plays it presents throughout the year? The charming children's theater productions? Or for its annual barbecuing of Utah culture that is "Saturday's Voyeur"? No need to choose here.

Editors' Choice

Winner

Ballet West • Salt Lake City's premier ballet troupe has been getting some deserved national exposure through the CW reality series "Breaking Pointe" and by taking its acclaimed "Nutcracker" on the road to Washington, D.C., last fall. Most locals are familiar with BW's "Nutcracker," using the choreography that founding artistic director Willam Christensen designed when he first popularized the holiday staple in America. But with the troupe's 50th anniversary season approaching, it's worth checking out the rest of Ballet West's slate.

First runner-up

Salt Lake Acting Company • (See People's Choice.)

Second runner-up

Utah Symphony | Utah Opera • (See People's Choice.)

Museums/galleries

People's Choice

Winner

Natural History Museum of Utah • The shiny copper edifice of the new Rio Tinto Center allows the Natural History Museum of Utah to breathe and lets curators create a vivid walk-through depiction of life in the Salt Lake Valley through the past few epochs. Interactive exhibits allow museumgoers to imagine the region's future as well as its past, while the animal exhibits show what happens when a museum's experts excavate their old basement.

First runner-up

Utah Museum of Fine Arts • (See Editors' Choice.)

Second runner-up

Brigham Young Museum of Art • Don't let BYU's squeaky-clean image fool you: This Provo museum is thoroughly modern. Recent exhibits have featured Pop Art stars such as Andy Warhol, the industrial landscapes of photographer Edward Burtynsky (now on display) and examinations of monsters and superheroes in culture.

Editors' Choice

Winner

Utah Museum of Fine Arts • This is the state's showpiece for art, classical and modern. Lately, the focus has been on interesting modern art, whether it's Lawrence Weiner's text-driven artwork (now on display in the museum's main gallery), the "outsider art" of Arkansas photographer Mike Disfarmer (on display through July 14) or last year's exhibit of classic race cars and a fascinating retrospective of "Sun Tunnels" creator Nancy Holt.

First runner-up

Utah Museum of Contemporary Art • If you want to dare to be different, UMOCA is the place to do it. Now through December is the first-ever "Utah Biennial," featuring a wild and weird variety of Utah art — from Gianni Pettena's "Tumbleweeds Catcher" to the right-wing paintings of Jon McNaughton.

Second runner-up

Springville Museum of Art • There's a reason they call Springville "Art City" and this is it. A wealth of Utah artwork resides here, capturing the state's story in pictures and feelings. And, thanks to the quirky vision of emeritus director Vern Swanson, this Utah County town is the unlikely home to one of the biggest and richest collections of Soviet-era Russian art anywhere.

Festivals

People's Choice

Winner

Sundance Film Festival • The most prominent, most important film festival in the United States is right in our backyard. You can make your way up to Park City and, perhaps, hobnob with the stars. Or at least go star-gazing. If you're a film buff, it's nirvana. And you don't even have to go to Park City, because there are screenings in Salt Lake City and Ogden as well.

Robert Redford's effort to promote independent films has launched the careers of actors such as Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Edward Burns and directors such as Quentin Tarantino, Robert Rodriguez, Kevin Smith and Steven Soderbergh, just to name a few.

It also has put Utah and Park City on the map in the entertainment industry, focusing Hollywood's attention here for a couple of weeks in January every year.

First runner-up

Utah Arts Festival • Plenty to do; lots to eat; great entertainment; lots of heat.

Second runner-up

Utah Shakespeare Festival • Forsooth — high-quality, Tony-winning entertainment in Cedar City.

Editors' Choice

Winner

Sundance Film Festival • (See People's Choice.)

First runner-up

Salt Lake Greek Festival • Mmmmm … some of the best food you'll find all year long. This is a Salt Lake City tradition — something to look forward to every September.

Second runner-up

Utah Pride Festival • It's a chance to see that there really is diversity in Utah and have some fun! There's great entertainment, and people watching alone make it worthwhile. —

Utah at its best

You voted, and the results are in.

Allow us to introduce winners of The Salt Lake Tribune Choice Awards — your picks for the best Utah has to offer in dining, nightlife, arts and culture, recreation and destinations. Tribune editors weighed in as well, with their own selections in each category.

Did fellow readers get it right? Did we?