Firefighters advance containment on Colorado wildfire
Published: June 15, 2013 12:33PM
Updated: June 15, 2013 01:10PM
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Ray Miller, left, hugs his wife Cindy before he heads into the burn zone with a police escort Friday, June 14, 2013 to try to retrieve medication from their home that was burned to the ground in the Black Forest fire near Colorado Springs, Colo. Little more than 36 hours after it started in the Black Forest area northeast of Colorado Springs, the blaze surpassed last June's Waldo Canyon fire as the most destructive in state history. That blaze burned 347 homes and killed two people. Bradley thinks her home escaped the fire. (AP Photo/The Gazette, Michael Ciaglo)

Colorado Springs, Colo. • A Colorado sheriff says firefighters “are getting the upper hand” on the most destructive wildfire in state history as crews expanded containment with no new houses lost.

El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa also say officials are beginning to see the grim landscape the wildfire has left behind and some areas in the blaze’s path looked “like a nuclear bomb went off.” Because of that, Maketa said Saturday afternoon it’s difficult for officials know what used to be homes or other structures.

The fire that exploded Tuesday outside of Colorado Springs has destroyed nearly 500 homes and killed 2 people who appeared ready to flee. Containment is at 45 percent. It’s unknown what sparked the blaze.

Most mandatory evacuation orders have been lifted.