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You can't force a moment to be special

Published February 8, 2013 1:01 am

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Dear Carolyn • I have a favorite song that I sing to my 9-month-old daughter. I would like to discourage other family members from singing this special song to her. Is that a realistic thought? If so, how is the best way to handle it?

Mom

Dear Mom • Controlling, yes; realistic, no. The best way to handle it is to resolve not to try so hard to handle things. A song you sing to your child will become special because it is, not because you've decided it will be. There will never be a shortage of totems, symbols or special moments between a parent and a well-loved child. So you don't need to force the issue of your special place. In fact, in doing so you risk looking past the meaningful moments and mementos that your lives together will produce organically — and, in this case, you also risk interfering with the crucial connections between these other family members and your daughter.

Dear Carolyn • My best friend lives about six hours away, and we get together a couple times a year, either with kids or without. There is one weekend in particular that I visit and we participate in a road race together. Last year, a mutual friend found out about my upcoming trip and said, "That sounds like fun! I think I'll join you!" The trip was OK, but I missed being able to truly catch up with my friend and the fifth wheel started to get on both our nerves. The annual trip is now fast approaching, and the mutual friend keeps bringing it up, assuming she is invited. My inclination is to tell a white lie and say I'm not going, but I fear she would find out (we work together). I have a feeling you are going to advise me to be direct, but how do you tell someone you don't want them to intrude on your weekend getaway?

Running From Fifth Wheel

Dear Running • You offer them something you would like to share instead, that's how. You explain to her that, dorky as it sounds, this trip is a special and long-standing tradition and you and the other friend share, "but let's (blank) instead." Think carefully before you fill in that blank, because the whole thing hinges on the sincerity of that offer.

Carolyn Hax's column runs Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.