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For iconic Burberry, going digital is a fit

Published December 26, 2012 4:53 pm

Retail • Fashion brand aims to stay relevant by pushing mobile boundaries.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Chicago • Angela Ahrendts may be CEO of Burberry, but one of her favorite accessories is an Apple iPhone5 that she's used to oversee a mobile makeover at the 150-year-old company best known for trenchcoats and tartan plaids.

"This is the biggest flagship store in the world," Ahrendts said, holding up her iPhone during an interview in Chicago, where Burberry just last month opened a store. The Michigan Avenue site immerses customers in all things digital — from iPads for children to play with to video screens streaming Burberry fashion shows.

Burberry has long stuck to its English roots, giving its look from time to time modern tweaks, but it's been Ahrendts and chief creative officer Christopher Bailey in the past few years who have pushed the brand's digital, and now mobile, boundaries.

"It's very easy to allow an iconic brand to remain true to its heritage and at the same time [become] obsolete," said Marshal Cohen, chief retail industry analyst with market research firm The NPD Group. "The hard thing to do is keep the iconic brand relevant. This is about somebody at the helm deciding they're going to find a way" to do that.

Burberry has done sot by making moves that it says attract a millennial consumer. That includes monthly updates at Burberry.com, where Ahrendts said more people visit every week than walk into all the brand's stores around the world combined.

The company has an internal social network called Burberry chat. And since Ahrendts started in 2006 she has been hiring a team of "digital natives" with titles such as mobile director and music director. The brand also has a strategic innovation council.

Although some efforts were under way when she took the helm, Ahrendts said Burberry was "a manual spreadsheet organization" at the time.

"We just kept evolving the structure," she said. "We always said if we were going to target a millennial consumer, then we had to do it in their mother tongue, which is digital."

Cohen said iconic luxury fashion brands have the story to attract consumers, but the challenge is finding the right means of communicating it in the digital world. "They have to turn the store into a story and the story into a site," Cohen said.

The Burberry website offers 10 times more online than what the company has in stores "because we say that is 'the world's store,' " Ahrendts said.

Mobile commerce gives customers instant access to products they aspire to own. "To me, the key is that even the luxury brands have to learn, have to evolve," Cohen said. "Without evolution the luxury brands will be overtaken by more progressive, up and coming luxury brands. Luxury has to worry about keeping their brand alive."

Burberry is interacting directly with consumers in the digital sphere, too, launching projects such as artofthetrench.com. The website invites users to upload pictures of themselves wearing Burberry trenchcoats, which have been made by the label since World War I. The result is a collage from around the world.

Burberry.com also features Burberry Bespoke, which lets users customize their own trench, down to buttons and belts.

Ahrendts wants Burberry online and Burberry offline to be seamless for customers. But it's not without challenges in a digital world where fashion buyers can become overwhelmed with emails, tweets and others messages.

"How do we keep the brand so cool and so pure and so relevant so it cuts through that clutter?" she wonders — then answering her own question, adds, "But by the same token how do we keep the marketing and the communication much more customized and personalized." —

Burberry online

O Go to http://www.burberry.com and artofthetrench.com