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IRS has tax tips for Utah filers who missed April 17 deadline

Published April 30, 2012 6:51 pm

Advice • More than 92,000 Utahns either sought extensions or were late with returns.
This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2012, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

The 2011 personal income tax filing season isn't over for at least 92,500 Utahns who were unable to file their returns by the April 17 deadline and asked the Internal Revenue Service for a six-month extension. Nor is the filing season over for anyone who missed the April deadline and didn't seek an extension to Oct. 15 ­— and are now wondering what to do.

The IRS has some advice:

File as soon as possible • Your cash penalty and interest will be less if you file quickly.

The penalty for filing late is usually 5 percent of the amount due for each month or part of a month a return is late.

Interest usually accrues at a rate of one-half of 1 percent of the amount due for each month or part of a month a return is late.

No late-filing penalty will be assessed to filers who sought an extension. But they will be charged interest.

The IRS will consider interest reductions for people who can establish a reasonable cause for filing late.

People who did not ask for an extension will be charged both the penalty and interest.

Pay as much as possible • Then apply for an installment plan to pay the remaining balance.

File IRS Form 9465 to apply. Or apply online at http://1.usa.gov/1yKtc.

Fill for free • Free electronic filing is available to taxpayers with incomes of $57,000 or less.

You may qualify for a refund • Even if your income is below the normal filing requirement, you may be entitled to a refund of taxes that were withheld from your wages.