Mitt who? Jimmer wins Mormon of the Year honor
Published: January 16, 2012 11:11AM
Updated: January 16, 2012 11:04AM
Jimmer Fredette has scored again, winning 2011 Mormon of the Year from a popular LDS blog.

Fredette led BYU’s basketball team to the NCAA tournament and went on to earn virtually every major National Player of the Year honor, including the Wooden Award, the Naismith Award, the Adolph Rupp Trophy and the Oscar Robertson Trophy, writes Kent Larsen at the site, Times and Seasons. A first-round draft choice, he currently plays for the NBA's Sacramento Kings.

The selection also was based on the fact that "Jimmer-mania" popularity was so outsized among LDS young people, Larsen adds, that it attracted national attention.

Previous winners include Elizabeth Smart (2010), Harry Reid (2009) and Mitt Romney (2008).

The designation is based partially on online voting, with the final selection made by the blog’s 12 permanent staff members.

Another LDS blog, bycommonconsent.com, chose "Book of Mormon" musical creators Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Robert Lopez as the 2011 Boggs-Doniphan Gentiles of the Year.

Voting in the clearly unscientific online poll was not even close — the trio won by a landslide (262 to 32 votes for the next nearest nominee — Sean “Diddy” Combs, who tweeted a quote from LDS apostle L. Tom Perry).

“Our winning trio’s work also seems to have reset the bar for minimally socially acceptable treatment of Mormons higher than it has been in the past,” writes Cynthia Lee in her explanation of the selection. “Now, if you want to mock Mormons in polite society, you have to do it with healthy helpings of affection and humor and an admission that we aren’t any crazier than any other religious people.”

Previous winners were Judge Vaughn Walker, who invalidated Proposition 8 (2010), Stephen Colbert (2009) and Mike Huckabee (2008).

The Boggs-Doniphan Gentile of the Year designation is a recognition of the effect that the person or group of persons recognized has had during the past year. It is named after Gov. Lilburn Boggs, the Missouri politician who issued the infamous "1838 Extermination Order," saying Mormons should be treated as enemies of the state and driven from their homes, and Gen. Alexander William Doniphan, the militia leader who refused to carry out the order to arrest and execute LDS founder Joseph Smith and other church leaders.

Peggy Fletcher Stack