BUREAU - The Salt Lake Tribune http://www.sltrib.com/feeds/topics/BUREAU News from The Salt Lake Tribune en-us webmaster@sltrib.com (Webmaster) Elko County, Nevada, to send anti-federal message by horseback http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/world/58382510-68/federal-elko-gerber-grazing.html.csp <div class="hnews hentry item"> <h4><a class="url entry-title" href="http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/world/58382510-68/federal-elko-gerber-grazing.html.csp">Elko County, Nevada, to send anti-federal message by horseback</a></h4> <span class="author source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">The Associated Press</span></span> <h5><span class="updated" title="2014-09-06T21:52:23.723-06:00">Updated Sep 6, 2014 09:52PM MDT</span></h5> <div class ="entry-content">Elko, Nev. • A rural Nevada county will send a message the old-fashioned way to Washington about what it calls federal overreach on public lands: by horseback. Elko County Commissioner Grant Gerber said riders will begin the 2,800-mile ride at Point Reyes, California, around Sept. 26 and reach the U.S. Capitol about 20 days later. Multiple riders covering 5 miles each at a time will carry the commissioners’ resolution touching on various issues including livestock grazing, water rights and wild...</div> <h5><a rel="item-license" href="#license-583825102014-09-06T21:52:23.723-06:00" id="#license-2014-09-06T21:52:23.723-06:00"> Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.</a></h5> </div> 58382510@www.sltrib.com Sat, 06 Sep 2014 21:52:23 MDT Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/world/58220549-68/cave-meachen-scientists-bones.html.csp <div class="hnews hentry item"> <h4><a class="url entry-title" href="http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/world/58220549-68/cave-meachen-scientists-bones.html.csp">Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated</a></h4> <span class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Associated Press</span></span> <h5><span class="updated" title="2014-07-24T12:42:02.56-06:00">Updated Jul 24, 2014 12:42PM MDT</span></h5> <div class ="entry-content">Cheyenne, Wyo. • For the first time in three decades, scientists are about to revisit one of North America’s most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: the bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at least 30 feet deep at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming is 85 feet deep and almost impossible to see until you’re standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals — including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, Americ...</div> <h5><a rel="item-license" href="http://www.sltrib.com/pages/privacy"> Copyright 2013 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.</a></h5> </div> 58220549@www.sltrib.com Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:42:02 MDT