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Political Cornflakes

News roundup: After bashing Bush, Trump leans on his former aides for help

First Published      Last Updated Apr 17 2017 12:02 pm

After bashing Bush, Trump leans on his former aides for help. Chaffetz opponent raises more cash than him. Tax Day protestors bring out a 10-foot-tall chicken to parody Trump.

Happy Monday. Throughout his presidential campaign, Donald Trump repeatedly declared that "the last thing we need is another Bush," as he vowed to take on two political dynasties — the Bushes and the Clintons. But as president, Trump has been increasingly dipping into the talent pool from the George W. Bush administration that he regularly vilified during the campaign to now fill critical administration posts. [Politico]

Topping the news: Trump’s new 100-day plan to revamp the U.S.-China trade relationship has led to a chilling of relations that could stunt domestic expansion and negatively affect Utah. Shifts in trade between the two countries are already hitting the state and underscoring its high stakes in the debate. [Trib]

-> Organizers of a Tax Day March in Salt Lake City used a 10-foot chicken mascot resembling Trump to symbolize a question many Americans are asking: "Why is he too chicken to show his taxes?" [Trib] [DNews] [ABC4] [KUTV] [Fox13]

-> Democratic candidate Kathryn Allen, who plans to run against Rep. Jason Chaffetz in 2018, raised nearly $400,000 more than the five-term Republican congressman — most of which comes from small donations and none from political action committees. [Trib] [DNews]

-> The Utah Attorney General’s Office and a pair of LGBT groups are seeking a second extension on a lawsuit over now-repealed legislation banning the discussion of homosexuality in Utah schools in an effort to allow time for the state school board to amend its policies. The lawsuit will likely be dropped once the rules are adopted. [Trib]

Tweets of the day: From @p_stanton"Everyone should question the nepotism in Trump’s WH when Barron collects the most eggs at the WH Easter Egg Roll."

-> From @levynews: "My morning routine: 1) check Twitter to make sure we didn’t bomb North Korea 2) make coffee"

-> From @altNOAA"When paying your taxes this year, include a note & let the IRS know what percentage you’d like to apply to fuel Air Force One for golf trips"

Happy Birthday: To Taylorsville City Council member Kristie Overson, former gubernatorial spokesman Marty Carpenter and attorney Randy Dryer. And happy belated to Derek Miller, president and CEO of World Trade Center Utah, whose birthday was Sunday.

Opinion section: A.B. Neil, a psychology major at Weber State University, argues political parties create know-nothing citizens and says they must be loosened in order to prevent further damage to the United States. [Trib]

-> Chuck Tripp, a now-retired professor of political science at Westminster College, offers a primer on Supreme Court decision making, which he argues usually acts in defense of "the wealthy, propertied classes in U.S. society, meaning companies, corporations, the rich, socio-economic conservatives and so on." [Trib]

-> Don Guymon, chairman of Utah GrassRoots, argues that the rights of U.S. citizens have been in jeopardy for years as government has grown and created an environment where one individual can have too much power. [Trib]

-> Bill Crim, president and CEO of United Way of Salt Lake, urges Congress to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit for workers not raising children at home by increasing the refund size for this group and lowering the age of eligibility to 21, which he says would benefit 99,000 working Utahns. [Trib]

-> Holly Richardson, a former state legislator and the mother of children from eight different countries, outlines the importance of empathy and action in addressing the refugee crisis. [Trib]

-> Ali Noorani, the executive director of National Immigration Reform, celebrates immigration responses in Utah and urges the nation to embrace the state’s values. [Trib]

-> Laura Schmidt, an outreach coordinator for HEAL Utah, asks the state’s elected officials to hear the people on climate change and to take the first step toward tackling any problem — acknowledging there is one in the first place. [Trib]

-> Eric Rumple, author of "Forgive Our Debts," offers a plan to develop a state-of-the-art park — comparable to the size and stature of Central Park in New York — at the about-to-be-vacated Utah State Prison, which he says would demonstrate to the world that Utah values families, work/life balance and the environment. [Trib]

-> Jennifer Webb, a graduate student at George Washington University, advocates for changes she says would help decrease Utah’s high rate of child and young adult suicide, such as expansion of support resources and a breaking down of the stigma that prevents mental health intervention. [Trib]

-> Brent Taylor, the mayor of North Ogden City and the newest member of the Utah Transit Authority Board of Trustees, offers solutions he says would improve UTA governance and earn back public trust, with his main recommendations dating back to the country’s founding ideals of separation of powers and checks and balances. [Trib]

-> Chad E. Bittner, a practicing family physician for nearly 20 years, urges Utahns to set aside time during National Healthcare Decisions Week today through April 22 to start conversations about end-of-life care preferences. [Trib]

-> David A. Moore, a certified family physician, urges his colleagues to begin prescribing a "highly effective" medication called Suboxone to treat opiate addiction. [Trib]

-> Tribune columnist George Pyle celebrates his colleagues at The Salt Lake Tribune for winning the Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting. [Trib]

-> Pat Bagley imagines the "Mar-a-Lago Golf Express" flying away from President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign promises. [Trib]

-> Robert Gehrke argues that Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes should divest his campaign account of recent contributions — which have totaled more than $100,000 since he became one of two likely candidates for chairman of the Federal Trade Commission — and start the job, if chosen, with clean hands to avoid conflicts of interest. [Trib]

-> Frank Pignanelli and LaVarr Webb examine the public profile of Democratic Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams and explore the possibility of him running for a higher office. [DNews]

In other news: Though it’s unclear just how much say South Salt Lake council members or the mayor will have in the operations of the new homeless resource center the county has saddled it with, the city is shopping around for ideas about how to avoid replicating the chaos surrounding The Road Home in Salt Lake City.  [Trib]

-> Recently released information from a public records request show the 2010 compensation packages for two former Utah Transit Authority executives were valued at more than $1.1 million each annually. Concerns with UTA’s executive bonuses has been one of the focuses of an ongoing investigation from federal prosecutors. [DNews]

-> A $650 million project to build a new state prison north of Salt Lake City International Airport has an expected completion date of November 2020, and officials say it will take at least six months to move prisoners over from the current Draper facility. But as designers work to control costs, they say they may not be able to fit as many prisoners as the plan currently calls for. [Trib] [DNews]

-> Draper residents watched construction crews for the American Preparatory Academy demolish a home Friday morning to make way for an emergency access route to the construction site of its new charter high school — intensifying frustrations about poor planning for the school’s construction. [Trib]

-> A daylong summit sponsored by the University of Utah’s Black Faculty and Staff Association brought together nearly 100 black researchers, community activists, politicians, educators and students and encouraged them to run for political office and participate in policymaking. [Trib]

-> Organizers behind the Our Schools Now tax-reform plan, which looks to generate $750 million for education, are looking to bring the question about a seven-eighths of 1 percent income tax increase to Utah voters after the proposal failed in this year’s Legislature. [Trib]

-> A previously confidential agreement between the state and Amazon, under which the online retailer began collecting sales tax on Utahns’ purchases Jan. 1, includes language that the company has no liability for past tax collection and that the state will claim no authority to audit it for previous years. [Trib]

-> About 9,200 Utah taxpayers made a charitable donation on their tax returns in 2015. Utahns put the most money toward fighting homelessness but also contributed funds to education and body armor meant to protect service dogs from bullets. [Trib]

-> Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski chose Marc Woolley as the chief operating officer of the city’s urban renewal agency — a pick who comes with some baggage one council member says needs to be addressed. [Trib]

-> The West Jordan City Council seat vacated last month by controversial Councilman Jeff Haaga has drawn record interest with 31 candidates — a quarter of whom are women. [Trib]

-> Pleasant Grove residents submitted 1,636 signatures to the Utah County clerk-auditor’s office in an effort to get an $2.65 million ballot initiative to fix what they call neglected and crumbling roads. The City Council previously opposed the initiative based on the belief it would hinder city operations. [Trib]

-> Last week, a Utah County judge praised a former Mormon bishop as "an extraordinary, good man" before sentencing him to prison for sexually abusing two women. Now, some who were in the courtroom and a Utah civil rights group plan to file a complaint against the judge. [Trib] [APviaDNews]

-> A Third District Juvenile Court Judge ruled that Abdi Mohamed, a teen shot by police while allegedly beating a homeless man, will remain in the juvenile court system. [Fox13]

-> At the 11th annual Economic Summit, Gov. Gary Herbert celebrated Utah’s accolades for its business climate and quality of life but noted the state faces challenges — primarily with the urge to become complacent in light of economic success stories and joblessness and lack of employment diversity in rural areas. [DNews]

-> F-35 jets from Utah’s Hill Air Force Base will be conducting air training over the next few weeks at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England — marking the aircraft’s first overseas training deployment to Europe. [Trib] [ABC4]

-> A West Bountiful woman who was injured last month and her husband killed in a terror attack in London has returned to Utah to continue her recovery process. [Trib] [KUTV]

-> Members of the Venezuelan Association of Utah and a local family whose son is incarcerated in that country gathered together at the Capitol on Saturday to call for freedom, democracy and justice after a recent coup there. [ABC4] [KUTV]

-> Last week, The Salt Lake Tribune won the second Pulitzer Prize in its history for its reporting on campus sexual assaults. Learn more about how it won its first Pulitzer — covering a deadly midair collision that sent two airplanes crashing into the Grand Canyon. [Trib]

Nationally: An attempted missile launch by North Korea failed "almost immediately" on Sunday. In a brief response to the launch, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said: "The president and his military team are aware of North Korea’s most recent unsuccessful missile launch. The president has no further comment." [CNN] [NYTimes] [NBCNews] [WaTimes]

-> Thousands of Americans gathered in cities across the country to call on President Donald Trump to release his individual tax returns — a precedent set by every president going back to Gerald Ford. In response, Trump labeled the protests as "small" and suggested the rallies were paid for but cited no evidence. [NYTimes] [NPR] [NBCNews] [ABCNews]

-> The White House announced it would cut off public access to the names of its visitors, reversing the policy of former President Barack Obama and citing "grave national security risks and privacy concerns." [NPR] [TheHill] [NYTimes] [WaPost]

Where are they?

  • Rep. Jason Chaffetz speaks at Timpanogos Academy and Lehi Elementary, hits a round table lunch with Utah Valley Chamber and hosts Congressional award ceremony in Provo office.
  • Gov. Gary Herbert meets with the Sutherland Institute, holds a Ceremonial Bill Signing of S.C.R. 6 in the Gold Room, sits down with staff and then hits BYU’s Ask Eleven Live Filming on the BYU Campus.
  • Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox heads to the AAA Great Utah ShakeOut Event, joins the IGP Welfare Reform Commission and then drops by the Capitol Preservation Board Meeting.
  • State Auditor John Dougall meets with staff and then State Treasurer David Damschen and the Navajo Trust Fund board.
  • State Treasurer David Damschen meets with Dougall and the Navajo Trust Fund board.

Got a tip? A birthday, wedding or anniversary to announce? Email us at cornflakes@sltrib.com. If you haven’t already, sign up for our weekday email and get this sent directly to your inbox. [Trib]

-- Thomas Burr and Taylor Stevens

Twitter.com/thomaswburr and Twitter.com/tstevens95




 

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